Gluten Free Nut Free Candy from Dare

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Licorice is probably one of the hardest candies to find gluten free.  As an alternative, I suggest checking out candy from Dare.  Dare seems to be sensitive to all sorts of allergies and has pretty good labeling on their packages.


We recently went on a trip to Toronto to visit family.  We have two young kids that really don't know how to chew gum to help with the air pressure at take off and landing, so I thought to seek out some candy.  One of our daughters has a nut allergy, and nut free candy is REALLY hard to find.  Probably harder to find than candy made without gluten.  I wanted something chewy that they wouldn't be able to go through quickly, so I picked up these Jubes made by Dare clearly labelled peanut free, no artificial flavours, and gluten free.

I know candy is not ideal for everyone, but heck, I have such a sweet tooth, I am happy to have these in the house knowing they are safe both for Amanda and her Celiac, and my daughters nut allergy.

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Soft and Chewy Gluten Free Brownies

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I shared this on on Facebook last week, but I thought I would share the recipe on the blog too because it was so tasty!

My mother n law is always baking amazing treats. When Amanda was diagnosed Celiac, she just took that on as a challenge to experiment even more. Not only has she converted some of her family favourites like honey cake to be gluten free, but she is always look for new gluten free treats to bake.

Check out this recipe she adapted from food.com


Ingredients
  • 2 cups almond butter or sun flower seed butter
  • 2 eggs 
  • 1 1/4 cups agave nectar 
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract 
  • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 cup dark chocolate chips
Directions
  • Blend butter until smooth
  • Blend in eggs and then nectar and vanilla 
  • Blend in cocoa, salt and baking soda then fold in chocolate chips
  • Grease a 9c13 baking dish
  • Pour batter into dish
  • Bake at 325 for 35-40 minutes

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Celiac Medical Expenses for Tax Deductions in Canada

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Don't forget your Celiac Expense for the 2017 tax year!

Happy New Year everyone!  With the end of one year, simply (and yes I know obviously), is the beginning of another.  Which means, if you have not in the past (because it is probably too late for the 2016 tax year), start collecting your receipts for purchases of gluten free products.


The Canada Revenue Agency allows you claim incremental costs associated with the purchases of gluten free products.  What does this mean?  It means when doing your taxes, you can claim the difference in cost between what you paid for a loaf of gluten free bread to eat vs. what a non-celiac would pay for a loaf of bread.

What you need to know to make the Celiac Medical Expense claim:
  • A doctors note listing your Celiac Diagnosis and the fact you require a gluten free diet
  • Receipt for each gluten free product purchase
  • A summary showing your calculation for the tax year.
Here is Revenue Canada's Example

1. Item: bread
2. Number of items purchased: 52
3. Average cost of non-GF product: $3.49
4. Average cost of GF product: $6.99
5. Incremental cost (line 4 minus line 3): $6.99 - $3.49 = $3.50
6. Amount to claim (line 5 multiplied by line 2): $3.50 x 52 = $182.00

So why go through this?  Because afterall, it does require some work right?  Well, for me, it is simple, not even really about having Celiac Disease, it is about getting everything you can back from the government.  You work, you pay taxes, and you can get some of that money back.  Why not get as much of that money back as possible!  Am I right?

Check out the Canada Revenue Agency's gluten free section of the website for more details and updates

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